Pharaoh Hound

Country of origin:
Malta
Height (cm):
53-63,5
Weight (kg):
20-25
Life span (years):
12-14
Colour:
tan, rich tan with white markings
Size:
large
Hair length:
short
Recognized by:
FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR, CKC
FCI code:
248
Intelligence:
Good with kids:
Trainability:
Shedding:
Watchdog:
Adaptability:
Allergy:
No
Download standard:
Overview
The elegant Pharaoh Hound can surprise you from the very first day you meet this unique dog. Have you ever heard about dogs blushing? In spite of its royal origin, this breed can be so funny, when entertaining people. Feeling happy or excited, the Pharaoh Hound smiles and even blushes on its nose and ears.

History

The Pharaoh Hound appeared more than 5000 years ago in Egypt, according to ancient artefacts, depicting this breed as a gazelle and rabbit hunter and a companion dog of the kings and other nobles. Regrettably, the ancestry of the Pharaoh Hound is lost in the mists of time. It’s very possible that ancestor of this breed is the small, lithe wolf from the Arabian peninsula.

The name of the breed may signalize this dog to hunt together with Egyptian pharaohs. Many centuries ago this breed was also named the Kelb-tal Fenek, which means «dog of the rabbit».

The Pharaoh Hound was imported to Malta and Gozo about 2 000 years ago possibly by Phoenician and Carthaginian tribes, and since then, the breed is considered to be the national dog of Malta.

By the year 1960 this breed became one of the most popular among Egyptian breeds. Perhaps one of the reasons is that the Pharaoh Hound is not only an elegant dog with a beautiful red coat, but also an excellent hunter that can do its job using sight, nose and years at the same time.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the Pharaoh Hound only in 1984, and before that the breed was practically unknown. It is still one of uncommon breeds, although there’re a lot of people, appreciating his unique nature around the world.

Temperament

Pharaoh Hound is a positive, kind and pleasing dog. On the other side, they can be suspicious and aloof towards strangers or your guests that makes them good watchdogs. The minus is that the Pharaoh Hound likes barking, and doesn’t seem to get tired of it.

Living in a family with children or without is perfect for Pharaoh Hounds. These dogs are usually a bit of a sensitive plant, being very nice and loving to their families. Anyway, remind your children, that dog is a dog, not a toy.

The properly trained Pharaoh Hound can stand other animals and pets, although it is aggressive with other dogs of the same gender and small pets and animals. As a hunting breed, your pet must be always supervised.

Health Problems
The most common problems for the breed include:

• allergies
• anesthesia sensitivity
• elbow dysplasia
• hip dysplasia
• hypothyroidism
• Willebrand’s disease

Grooming
The Pharaoh Hounds, as opposed to Egyptian pharaohs, doesn’t need special grooming. Weekly brushing is the first requirement for keeping this breed in shape. Bathing isn’t necessary, as long as you don’t feel your pet stinking.

Brush the teeth of your dog at least three times a week and trim its nails if they start clicking the floor. Check skin and ears on redness, cuts or nicks. When you have problems with grooming or just suspect something, ask your vet for a professional help.

Training
The Pharaoh Hound is a smart breed that is usually characterized as a dog desired to please its master, and such dogs are easily trainable. Each training session should be interesting and active, but short and not routine.

You, as a trainer, should be patient and take most with humour. If you want your Pharaoh Hound behave politely with everything and everybody, start socialization from the very beginning.

Exercise
The Pharaoh Hound needs about half of an hour of energetic exercise daily. Take your pet on a family cycling or jogging, let it participate in all games. Remember, your dog is no mummy, and needs to stretch its legs.
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